tools

Tools.

  • A drill andbits
  • Hack saw
  • File (s)
  • Spanner (2)
  • Angle grinder, (or files and time!)
  • Welder
  • Normal stuff really, apart from the welder. (You could always borrow/hire one but get a
    little help if you are in ANY doubt. It’s hot and bright
    !).

Part 1

My Cheap Woodworking Lathe

(c)2007Paul Pinfield

To hold the wood at the headstock (motor end) I just welded a nut that would fit onto the spindle of the motor [right] to a little metal plate [below]. You can get them or something similar from any hardwarestore, or probably around the house somewhere. Or you could just cut off a bit of flat steel bar and drill some holes in it. Check the way the motor turns andthat the thread will tend to tighten as the lathe spins rather than undo, for obvious reasons. I guess there’s no reason why you can’t put the motor at the right hand side of the work if your motor turns clockwise. The cheapest and simplest way to do this is to walk around the table!! Whatever way you put it,
the top of the work MUST be spinning towards you when you start turning.


Since this is really just about making a cheap lathe I won’t go
into how to turn wood or stone. Suffice to say DON’T try turning at all without
a bit of research. Clearly it spins fast and things go wrong fast if you mess
up, so Beware and take Care.


Dangerous stuff
Alert

live electricity, fast moving parts, sharp edges [shudders]. Do
Not undertake this project unless you are absolutely sure you have the skills to
complete it safely.

Disclaimer: No
liability is accepted by Junkdojo or the article author for any damage or injury
howsoever caused in the use of this information.

I made this one soyou could clamp or screw it to a bench, table (sturdy), or any old Chippendale sideboard you happen have lying around. The steel came from the local scrap dealer. It’s 50mmx50mm (2x2in) square section steel tube. Usually it’s available in two wall thicknesses and I would go for the thicker one if you can. The more solid and stable a lathe is the better the results are and the safer it is to use.

The bits are dead easy to weld with even cheap gear. So a DIY arc welder and 10-15 electrodes will be enough. If you never done any welding, at this level, it’s dead easy. But get guidance and DON’T look at the brighty lighty or you will go slightly
blindy! 
Just cut up the bits and weld up the frame. The length of the lathe can be as you desire but the longer it is the less stable it is, especially if you are turning long thin stuff. You’ll have to fix up some mountings for the motor, to suit >. I welded a bit of 2×2 angle iron accross the frame and drilled a couple of holes in it to take the mounts. Again, it’s worth selecting the motor carefully. If you have, or can get, one that has the spindle right through, some lube holes, a motor that can easily be rewired to change direction of spin if you need to, and has convenient mounting points, it will be all the easier.

The “other” end isthe tailstock. Again just a bit of 2×2, a couple of nuts and bolts (one filed to
a point) and a bit of welding. The bolt that holds the work is filed sharpish and has a locking nut at the back of the mount. You need to weld a nut to the inside, motor end, face so you can adjust the pressure from the tailstock. I tapped one of the holes in the 2×2 on mine so you can’t see an inside nut in the picture. You need more kit for this so do it the easy way with nuts at either end.

The mount has a nut welded to the underside and a spacer plate welded on to hold the tailstock firmly in the slot of the frame. There’s also a spacer at the bottom end but it’s not really necessary as all it does is hold the bottom, loose plate at right angles while you move the tailstock up or down the frame. The bolt goes through the base plate and spacer clearance holes and screws into the nut in the bottom of the tailstock.

Dangerous stuff Alert

live electricity, fast moving parts, sharp edges [shudders]. Do
Not undertake this project unless you are absolutely sure you have the skills to
complete it safely.

Disclaimer: No
liability is accepted by Junkdojo or the article author for any damage or injury
howsoever caused in the use of this information.


Bonus Sharpening
Function

The chisel rest is made from a bit of flat steel with a bit of 1/2 in steel rod welded to it, filed to an angle at the top. This sits snug into a short length of steel tube welded to the mount, plus a bit of strengthening to both the mount and around the nut. The tube has a clearance hole through it and a nut welded over the hole. A bit of matching bolt is screwed through to do the tightening with a cut-off big nail through that, to turn it.>

The mount is fixed to the frame using the same approach as the tailstock. I was going to say “technique” but that’s kind of overstating it really!

The bolt has a “T” hat welded to it and it goes through a slot in the base plate so you can move the rest in and out. The assembly will also revolve so you can use it at an angle or spin it all to the back to get it out of the way when you are sanding, later. The rest itself can go up and down and turns in its tube so you can get it just about anywhere.

I welded together a couple of odd bits of steel to make up a rough chisel sharpening rest for the stone, and welded it on. You can’t move it at all but I haven’t needed to yet!

Just to add to the overall aesthetic appeal I stuck a regular (UK) light switch to the top of the motor with hot melt glue. I thought it’s probably not best practice, (the glue), but it has not come off yet and is very close to your hand if you need to turn off quick!

 

Dangerous stuff Alert

live electricity, fast moving parts, sharp edges [shudders]. Do
Not undertake this project unless you are absolutely sure you have the skills to
complete it safely.

Disclaimer: No
liability is accepted by Junkdojo or the article author for any damage or injury
howsoever caused in the use of this information.


DIY Tool Rest

Home Made Tool Rest